ELIZABETH KRIEF & JACQUES MANARDO RESIDENCY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The residency offers artists of all disciplines and nationalities the opportunity to reside in New York City for 1-3 months, has no obligation of a final production, and is free of objective aside from engaging with our city of fantasy, change, excess, power, possibility, hustle and grandeur.

Everyone finds their own way and the experiments are impossible to anticipate. New York changes all who visit; we’re anxiously waiting to see what resident artists see and discover. Artists will be home in a furnished apartment in the heart of Brooklyn near The Invisible Dog Art Center and are encouraged to live in total immersion, connect with one of the most vibrant artist communities, meet professionals from the international art world and participate in events in New York and abroad (Armory Show, Frieze, etc.).

The ELIZABETH KRIEF & JACQUES MANARDO ARTIST RESIDENCY PROGRAM @ THE INVISIBLE DOG requires applicants to have presented work in their country of origin (USA included) or abroad but having spent little to no time in New York City.

This 4 year program was made possible thanks to the exclusive support of Elizabeth Krief and Jacques Manardo.

We are pleased to announce that the first resident artist will be Emmanuel Bornstein (Germany), in March 2018.

If you want to apply, please send your proposal to residencykriefbrooklyn@gmail.com

 

Elizabeth Krief has been a curator and patron of contemporary art for over 30 years. She founded Galerie Krief in Paris (France) and directed it for 25 years before moving on to private advisory and supporting emerging artists. Recognizing Goya as a founder of Modern Art, she collected the etchings Los Caprichos, which she has exhibited internationally in connection with leading contemporary artists. In 2015, she was the major sponsor of Anima, the monumental installation by Invisible Dog’s artist Prune Nourry. She has organized several events in New York City to promote Tunisian craftsmanship and culture, including: World Nomads Tunisia 1&2 at French Institute Alliance Française in 2014 and 2015, and Tunisian Marks at Wanted Design in 2016. She is a co- founder of the Rambourg Foundation Award for Arts and Culture in Tunisia and Vice President in France of the Rambourg Foundation for Education, Art and Culture. Krief is a supporter of University of Jerusalem, the Festival International d’Art Lyrique in Aix-en-Provence (France) and a long standing member of Club Femmes Forum (France). She is Board member of Ecole des Beaux – Arts de Paris and is honored with the insignia of Officier of the Order of Arts and Letters, the prestigious cultural distinction awarded by France to civilians. Elizabeth Krief lives between Paris and New York.

The Invisible Dog Art Center opened in October, 2009, is a raw space in a vast converted factory building with a charmed history and an open-ended mission: to create, from the ground up, a new kind of interdisciplinary arts center. Over the last two years, over 60,000 people have attended events: visual art exhibits; dance, theater, and music performances; film screenings; literary arts and poetry readings; lectures; community events; and more. Long-term collaborations with artists are integral to The Invisible Dog’s mission, which is to create not only a new kind of art center, but also a new kind of artistic community. Neither a commercial gallery nor a concept-driven non-profit, The Invisible Dog has a unique role in the New York arts scene. It has become a place where artists working in all media can do things they wouldn’t be able to do anywhere else in New York. The Invisible Dog’s core values of experimentation and collaboration are kept in view throughout the curatorial process, and as a result, our artists are freer and more autonomous than is typical. The building at 51 Bergen Street is integral to The Invisible Dog’s identity. Built in the late 1800s, the 30,000 square-foot building housed working factories until the 1990s, when the last factory shut down, and the detritus from 100 years of industry was left to rot. The building was unused until 2008, when it was discovered by Lucien Zayan, its current Director. The last factory, which made belts, had a hit in the 1960s with the “invisible dog” party trick, which gave the nascent art center its name.

Press release PDF version in english

Press release PDF version in french